Coronavirus update:

In times of crisis, it is important to come together to care for one another. We are committed to the safety and health of our team, our patients, and our community. As new guidelines emerge from the CDC, we have been advised to postpone routine eye care. By limiting the number of patients and team members in our current open clinics and maintaining our rigorous disinfecting procedures, we are confident we can safely care for patients still in need of our services.

For all of our patients the Chaska, Glencoe, and Hutchinson clinics remain open Monday through Friday 8:30-5:00 with reduced services. We ask that you call before coming to our clinics so we can best meet your needs. We may be able to accommodate your product requests by drive up service or shipping directly to your home.

We will continue to care for patients that may require the following services: blurred vision, broken glasses without back up, low stock of contact lenses, red or irritated eyes, trauma, postoperative care, continuing care of diabetics, glaucoma, cataracts, macular degeneration and other eye diseases.

We truly appreciate your patience as we all work through this unprecedented yet tumultuous time.

Glaucoma

Glaucoma is a complicated disease in which damage to the optic nerve leads to progressive, irreversible vision loss. It is the second leading cause of blindness.

The most common form of the disease occurs when the ocular drainage canals become clogged over time. The inner eye pressure (also called intraocular pressure, or IOP) rises when the correct amount of fluid can’t drain out of the eye. With the most common form of glaucoma, the entrances to the drainage canals are clear, and should be working correctly. However, the clogging problem occurs farther inside the drainage canals. This is like a clogged pipe below the drain of a sink.

Glaucoma Symptoms & Risks

Most people will not experience symptoms, nor will they have any early warning signs. Open-angle glaucoma can cause a gradual loss of vision if it is not diagnosed and treated. The disease develops slowly and sometimes without visible vision loss for many years. It usually responds well to medication, especially if caught early and treated.

While anyone at any age can develop glaucoma, these conditions pose a higher risk:

  • A family history of glaucoma
  • Individuals over 40 years of age
  • Diabetics
  • Individuals of African or Mediterranean descent
  • People who’ve experienced an eye injury or trauma

People of all ages are at risk for developing glaucoma, and only an eye doctor can make a diagnosis. Routine eye examinations are important to detect and identify symptoms.

Please contact us at Southwest Eye Care to schedule your eye appointment today.