Coronavirus update:

In times of crisis, it is important to come together to care for one another. We are committed to the safety and health of our team, our patients, and our community. As new guidelines emerge from the CDC, we have been advised to postpone routine eye care. By limiting the number of patients and team members in our current open clinics and maintaining our rigorous disinfecting procedures, we are confident we can safely care for patients still in need of our services.

For all of our patients the Chaska, Glencoe, and Hutchinson clinics remain open Monday through Friday 8:30-5:00 with reduced services. We ask that you call before coming to our clinics so we can best meet your needs. We may be able to accommodate your product requests by drive up service or shipping directly to your home.

We will continue to care for patients that may require the following services: blurred vision, broken glasses without back up, low stock of contact lenses, red or irritated eyes, trauma, postoperative care, continuing care of diabetics, glaucoma, cataracts, macular degeneration and other eye diseases.

We truly appreciate your patience as we all work through this unprecedented yet tumultuous time.

Glaucoma: The Silent Thief of Sight

Did you know, nearly 2.2 million people in the United States are affected by glaucoma?* Due to the lack of symptoms in the early stages of glaucoma, almost half of Americans with glaucoma do not know they have it; causing glaucoma to be the second leading cause of blindness in the United States and worldwide.

What is glaucoma?

Glaucoma is an eye condition that damages the optic nerve in the eye and, if left untreated, can result in blindness. High pressure within the eye causes damage to the optic nerve and prevents the nerve from sending messages from the eye to the brain.

Typically, there are no symptoms or pain associated with glaucoma until severe vision loss has occurred; at which point vision loss is permanent and cannot be reversed. The degree of vision loss differs from each individual.

Symptoms

  • Most often has no symptoms
  • Damage starts in peripheral vision
  • Blurred vision
  • Distorted vision
  • Vision loss

Who is at risk?

According to the Glaucoma Research Foundation, African Americans are three times more likely to be affected by glaucoma, and six times more likely to suffer from blindness as a result of glaucoma. Hispanics and Latinos have the second highest risk for glaucoma. Those with a family history of glaucoma and diabetes are also at a higher risk. In order to help with early detection and to prevent irreversible vision loss, be sure to notify your eye doctor if glaucoma runs in your family or if you have diabetes.

Primary Types of Glaucoma

  • Primary open-angle glaucoma: Primary open-angle glaucoma causes peripheral vision to gradually reduce without any other symptoms. If not controlled or discovered, it can progress to tunnel vision and ultimately lead to blindness.
  • Acute angle-closure glaucoma: Acute angle-closure glaucoma, also called narrow-angle glaucoma, produces a variety of sudden symptoms such as eye pain, headache, halos, dilated pupils, vision loss, nausea, and vomiting. Each onset of new symptoms causes additional vision loss.
  • Normal tension glaucoma: Normal tension glaucoma occurs in patients with a normal pressure within their eye and typically has no symptoms associated until tunnel vision occurs.

 

*Glaucoma Research Foundation